Friday, July 16, 2004

The Death of Artemio Cruz

Carlos Fuentes, The Death of Artemio Cruz
Time-shifting narrative structure that anticipates Quentin Tarantino's filmic stylings; shifts in person that blur the roles of reader and protagonist. Fuentes manages to use first, third, and second person, without overly confusing or aggravating the reader. The shifts in time at first seem random, but as the novel rears to the finish--as expected, Artemio Cruz dies--the death scene is juxtaposed with Cruz's birth, and the narrative comes full circle. Satire, pathos, and lyric description collide in this magnificent work. I'd say much more, but I'll save it for my IB class this coming fall.

[originally posted July 12, 2004]

3 Comments:

Blogger TheTachyix said...

Dude, that was the greatest and most mind-warping book we read all year. If memory serves, the most profound passage can be found on 139-142. Indeed, I think it serves as a literary universal statement about the exsitence of all of us as individuals and as a race stuck on planet Earth.

8:17 PM  
Blogger Jim said...

It's the most richly-textured novel I've read, oh, since The Innocent by Ian McEwan. (Anything by McEwan is beautiful, simply beautiful.)

9:35 AM  
Blogger gary said...

Hey there. I hope you don't mind my leaving a message here - I tried to find a contact email.

I'm working for a BBC radio programme and I'm looking for fans of "The Death of Artemio Cruz" by Carlos Fuentes. I've just come across your blog, and your review of the novel.

We're recording a programme with Carlos Fuentes at the beginning of May, in which a studio audience and booklovers around the world will be able to ask the author questions about this book.

As a "Death of Artemio Cruz " fan, I wondered if there's anything you'd like to ask Carlos Fuentes about the novel? If so, please email me your question:
gary.stevens@bbc.co.uk

The interview with Carlos Fuentes is in a BBC World Service series called: "World Book Club". You can find information about the programme on our website:
www.bbc.co.uk/
worldservice/
programmes/
world_book_club.shtml
(although the webpage may still continue to advertise April’s recording with Nick Hornby for a day or two).

Thanks very much indeed. I'm looking forward to hearing from you. Best wishes.

2:52 AM  

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